Do Gila Monsters Eat Rabbits


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Do Gila Monsters Eat Rabbits. It’s all about quick reflexes

 

Do Gila monsters eat rabbits? Yes, birds, other small animals, and eggs, oh they love eggs of any variety and baby snakes and yes, baby rabbits. When it comes to meal plans, Gila monsters are equal opportunity eaters.

 There are several exciting things to note about a Gila monster and of course, what they eat is essential, but when they eat is truly surprising. Reports have it that a Gila monster eats on a good year about ten times on average, but when they do actually decide to eat, stand back.

 They’ve been known to consume a third or more of their entire body mass at a minimum.

When it comes to food choices, we don’t need to worry one of them will size us up as the next thirty years’ worth of TV dinners because Gila monsters aren’t traditionally aggressive. 

 We’re not saying you won’t get bitten if you decide to pick one up, but they’d rather scurry away in search of something a little better suited to their culinary requirements. As painful as it is to admit that yes, Gila monsters do eat rabbits, it’s even more painful should you be on the receiving end of a bite from a Gila monster.

 The venom they carry around in their glands usually won’t kill an average-sized human being, but it will still result in a painful experience and, in most cases, an ugly wound that will take a while to heal.

 

Speed is not a Gila monster’s friend

 

Do Gila Monsters Eat Rabbits? Not the nimble and quick bunnies for sure. Gila monsters traditionally aren’t known for their blinding speed in the 100-yard dash. 

 An adult Gila monster can usually manage about one mile per hour, and that’s more than likely when their stomach is empty. 

So how do they manage to catch and eat a mature cotton-tailed Thumper? They don’t; they use their front claws to burrow into snake dens or rabbit burrows and consume the infants. 

We know. Your stomach rolled just a bit then, didn’t it? Ours did too, but it’s the natural law of predatory existence.   Speaking of predatory existence, what’s really strange is that only a few predators love to munch on Gila Monsters.

 

Their Diet.

 

Unless they can’t locate anything a little tastier, a fox, mountain lion, coyote, or bird of prey will sometimes partake.

 It’s like those days when you discover the liver on the dinner table. It beats going to sleep listening to your stomach grumble, right?  Do Gila monsters eat rabbits? Yes, they do, but a Gila monster is lazy, preferring to lay about on a flat rock sunning and snoozing.

 It’s not like with their unimpressive speed, they’ll be able to snag a young or mature rabbit. All they’ll be able to do is slither back to the lounge and spin stories about “the one that got away.”

A Gila monster would rather get its meals without having to work for it, or at least spend as little effort as possible. Why do you think they only eat about 10 times a year?

 Gila monsters are sometimes confused with the Komodo dragon, but the dissimilarities are actually quite noticeable. Aside from a monstrous size difference, the Komodo can cover short distances at a sustained speed of around 12 times the Gila monster and the Komodo, unlike the Gila, has extremely sharp teeth and venom than can kill an average-sized human being within a few hours.

 Gila, Komodo, potato, not a potato.  

 We’re confident we’ve answered the fundamental “Do Gila monsters eat rabbits” question, but we’re going to take just a few more minutes to answer a couple more questions about our friends, the Gila monsters.

 

 You said the bite of a Gila monster won’t kill you. How bad is it really?

 

We said, “usually” won’t kill you. The most important part of dealing with a Gila monster bite is getting the creature’s jaws pried away from the bite area. It’s how the Gila kills its prey, by sinking teeth into the flesh and keeping it there as the venom from its glands seeps into the wound.

 If enough of the toxin makes it into your system, you could experience nausea, an increase in blood pressure, vomiting and chills, or fever. The best three things you can do are separate yourself from the Gila monster, irradiate the wound with water, and immediately seek medical assistance.

 

Can you keep a Gila monster as a pet?

 

We don’t recommend it, and neither does the United States and Mexico. Gila monsters have been on the “near threatened” list by the International Union for Conservation’s Red List of Endangered Species for years.

 If the power of a Gila monsters bite isn’t enough to sway you, the fine you’ll get if you get caught collecting Gila monsters will.

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